Hey Klout, Adding More Decimal Places Does Not Make Your Score More Accurate

Posted: October 26th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Klout, PeerIndex, Statistics | No Comments »

Klout has been hyping up their score changes for a week now. The CEO Joe Fernandez has claimed that this makes the score more accurate, more transparent, and may cure some forms of cancer (well maybe not the last claim). Let’s just say I haven’t been this disappointed since the 2000 election. Let’s start with their first claim: accuracy. See figure 1, my new score

It’s exactly the same graphic as before, but with two decimal places. While my 8th grade Chemistry teacher may be glad that they are using more significant digits, I honestly don’t care. They were there before, just not displayed. Lame.

In their blog post, they claim: “This project represents the biggest step forward in accuracy, transparency and our technology in Klout’s history.” They support this vague claim with the histogram below, showing the differences in Klout scores, before and after the change:

This histogram leaves tons of open questions. Is this different than your normal daily shift in scores? The histogram reminds me of a t-distribution with a fatter positive tail. If more people are signing up for Klout than are leaving, thats probably what it should look like anyways as users hookup more networks and gradually become more active online. The graphic doesn’t show that your score is any better, just that it changed. That’s not impressive at all.

My beef with Klout remains simply that the service provides us with no real validation or explanation of our scores. They don’t show us how many times we have been RT’ed, mentioned, etc. On Google, you can look up your page rank, on app stores you can see your average rating and number of ratings, on Klout, you are told that your true reach has increased, but not told what that implies or how you can verify it.

Klout is still the social influence measurement leader, but with Peerindex rapidly improving (and better in many ways in my opinion), and new competitors such as Proskore and Kred popping up, Klout should be worried. I’ll have a review of both Proskore and Kred up shortly as well so you can easily compare them for yourself.



Leave a Reply